Practical and Artistic Way to Help Flood Victims in Southern Alberta

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Practical because:

  • people who have lost their homes need warm bedding and something colourful in their lives
  • it’s quick and almost free for us as donors, just the cost of postage and an opportunity to whittle down your scraps
  • it’s easy so even people who have never quilted can put together a block
  • there’s a plan in place to make the quilts and give them to the victims

Artistic because:

  • this is a quick, improvisational block with few rules
  • the parameters of making each block in one colour will lead to a beautiful, cheery quilt

check out Cheryl Arkison’s post

for instructions for making and sending slabs and a photo proving what great quilts we’ll be able to make!

The photo shows my first slab.  It didn’t take long to whip up and I was able to use some of the scraps from the box labeled “funny size squares.”   Hmm, does Cheryl have a hidden camera in here or what?

There’s a story behind the little triangle in the bottom right-hand corner.  Promise not to tell the Quilt Police but after everything was sewn together and squared off at 15-1/2 inches I discovered a tiny hole in the corner of the hand-dyed fabric.  So I took a piece of the solid orange and snowballed it on.

If you can make a slab or three, please do, AND please spread the word!  Cheryl posted on Tuesday but the CQA just publicized her initiative this morning.

Other improvised things I’ve made can be seen here (artistic baby quilt) 

and the tote bag

and a nap quilt

But this is the first time I’ve confined myself to just one colour.  Just checked the pile of pre-made larger blocks but the colours are all jumbled up exactly like the earlier pieces I’ve made, so the next slabs will have to be made from scratch.

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One Response to “Practical and Artistic Way to Help Flood Victims in Southern Alberta”

  1. Baby Quilt for Bloggers Quilt Festival | Text/Isle Says:

    […] to use up scraps in a colour controlled way that results in a cohesive piece.  I’ve posted numerous times about slab blocks and Cheryl Arkison’s work which was what got me started on this […]


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